Monday, May 25, 2020

Saint Augustine Of Hippo Once Stated - 1247 Words

Saint Augustine of Hippo once stated, â€Å"The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page.† It was after stumbling across this statement that I was influenced to call up my friend and suggest a road trip. When we started off, it was a beautiful day. The bright morning sun peeked over the Appalachian mountains to bid us farewell as we packed our belongings into the 2011 Chevy Cruze. Dew still perched on the delicate leaves of various summer flowers while we rode down the road towards Tennessee. My friend Sarah drove. Her fingers tapped the steering wheel in rhythm to the Carrie Underwood song blaring from the radio. It was the radio’s job to keep us awake since we had left so early in the morning; however, it was not doing a good job as I fell asleep only twenty minutes into the ride. Sarah had to wake me up at the rest stop just outside of Roanoke, Virginia. â€Å"Hey, Allyson,† she called as she shook my shoulders, â€Å"it would be nice if you woke up, so I could take a nap.† I just mumbled an incoherent string of words in response. â€Å"I can just drive right back to Pennsylvania. We don’t have to take a road trip.† That got me up. I had so much invested into this trip like money and time. I sat in the driver’s seat and watched the road continuously channel under the car sort of like a conveyor belt. It was hypnotizing, just keeping my eye on the road. Before either Sarah or I knew it, we were already parked in front of our hotel in Gatlinburg,Show MoreRelatedSt. Augustine, The City Of God1236 Words   |  5 PagesReport on St. Augustine, The City of God Saint Augustine, The City of God,tr. J.W. Leedom; reprinted in C. Warren Hollister et al., eds, Medieval Europe: A Short Source Book (New york, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill, 1982; 4th ed.2002), 17-19. The City of God is written by Augustine, the Bishop of Hippo, in the early fifth century of the current era. The writings of Augustine deal with the intellectual problems Christians faced. Augustine lived in a time where the Roman Empire was in decline. King Alaric sackedRead MoreTheological Understandings of Mediated Grace2903 Words   |  12 Pages[4] Julian of Norwich, a fourteenth century anchoress, stated a similar belief in her work Showings, saying that â€Å"the soul may be always like God in nature and in substance.†[5] This makes sense considering that analogies compare otherwise different things by examining the similarities of particular qualities that they share. In this theory of imago dei, Julian believed that grace restored us to our original state of purity - thus grace once again acts as a bridge between the human and the supernaturalRead MoreEssay about Religious Challenges to Constructing a Democratic Iraq3427 Words   |  14 Pagesrequirement is that every scholar interpret the Quran in accordance with his or her historical background. This will lead to a practical understanding of the religion. One important observation about the religion and its relationship with government is stated by the leading scholar, Ãâ€"mer (2003), Islamic theology does not contain a comprehensive list of injunctions about the theory of political governance. The Quran only mentions a number of moral principles, which are relevant to political governance

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Support Children and Young People with Disabilities and...

Outline the legal entitlements of disabled children and young people and those with special educational needs. Anyone providing services for children with special needs – health, education or social service departments, as well as voluntary organisations – must act within the legal framework. Legislation can change at any time and all health, education and social care practitioners, also Early Years workers, should be alert to new Acts and Regulations. There have been many changes to legislation in the UK over recent years which have affected this and a gradual increase in entitlements for these pupils. The table below has a brief outline of the legal entitlements of disabled children and young people and those with special†¦show more content†¦Children’s Rights, Empowerment and Advocacy This takes action to ensure children and their families know what their rights are and how to put this entitlement into practice. Children are empowered to secure their rights and make their voice heard. Young children can be represented by an advocate to speak and interpret on their behalf. Education (Handicapped Children) Act 1970 This Act transferred the responsibility of children with special educational needs looked after by the health service to the local authority and as a result many special schools were built. Education Act 1993 This act required the code of practice be introduced for guidance on identification and provision of special educational needs. The role of the SENCO was introduced in schools and parents were able to challenge local authorities about providing for pupils with SEN. Every Child Matters (2004) This aims is to ensure that every child has the chance to fulfil their potential by reducing levels of educational failure, ill health, substance misuse, teenage pregnancy, abuse and neglect, crime and anti-social behaviour among children and young people. The five outcomes which mattered most to children and young people were: ââ€"  being healthy ââ€"  staying safe ââ€"  enjoying and achieving ââ€"  making a positive contribution ââ€"  economic well-being 1.2 Describe the assessment and intervention frameworks for disabledShow MoreRelatedSupport Children and Young People with Disabilities and Special Educational Needs.1846 Words   |  8 PagesNVQ Support Teaching and Learning In Schools Level 2 Trainee : Chris Gerry Trenance Learning Academy Newquay Unit TDA 2.15 – Support children and young people with disabilities and special educational needs. 1.1 – Outline the legal requirements of disabled children and young people and those with special educational needs. Most schools and academies now have written policies and parts of their mission statements specifically made for the inclusion and equality of SEN children. TheyRead MoreThe Mental Disabilities Include Autism, Down Syndrome And1348 Words   |  6 PagesThe mental disabilities include autism, Down syndrome and many more. They need support from their parents, guardians, teachers, the government, and anyone else is taking part in their day-to-day lives. Such children need attention so that they do not miss on the important parts of their lives. This study aims to look at the people involved in their lives and the roles and responsibilities they play. For those children and young people who researchers identify as having such needs, will be hard toRead MoreTda 2.4 Equality, Diversity and Inclusion in Work with Children and Young People1458 Words   |  6 Pagesin work with children and young people The current legislative framework protecting the equal rights of all children and young people are stated in the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989). These rights are extensive, including the right to education and the right for children and young people to have their views respected. The Children Act 1989 sets out the duty of local authorities to provide services according to the needs of all children and young people. Every ChildRead MoreLife Long Learning for Students with Disabilities Essay example639 Words   |  3 PagesProviding services for young students with disabilities is not negotiable. This is because, these young learners requires special care and services in their day to day activities. Developmental disability has become a common diagnosis in children these days. This disability starts during a child’s development period and may last for a life time. Special educational programs are available for children with development disabilities. The diagnosis of developmental disabilities can be done at an earlyRead MoreIdentify the Current Legislation and Codes of Practice to the Promotion of Equality and Valuing of Diversity.1402 Words   |  6 Pagesguidelines and procedures for ensuring equality. These policies must take account the rights of all children and young people. The policies in place work to ensure equality and inclusion; this can be conducted through the teaching and learning that occurs in the setting. However, the policies must also pay regard to the values and practice which are part of all aspects of school life. All work with children should be underpinned by the principles and values as stated in the National Occupational StandardsRead MoreSpecial Educational Needs And Disability887 Words   |  4 Pages(SEND) stands for Special Educational Needs and Disability. QUOTE A learner’s needs may be too complex for a class teacher to fully cater provide for. It is possible that more support and even specialist help maybe needed for example speech and language therapy. â€Å"This is usually when a child is described as having ‘special needs†. (Somerville Primary School, 2016). It is true that having SEND can affect a learner’s capacity to learn. A Send learner may show inappropriate behaviour, find it hardRead MoreNew Send Code Of Practice And How It Affects Schools And Teaching Practices1295 Words   |  6 Pagesthe new legislation that the government had put into place last year. The key piece of legislation is The Children and Families Act 2014. †¢ The SEND Code of Practice is part of the wider plan to improve outcomes for disadvantaged children. †¢ Feb 2011 – the DfE published its Green Paper titled ‘Support and Aspiration’ a new approach to special needs and disability. †¢ March 2014 – Children and Families Bill received Royal Assent. †¢ 22nd April 2014 – The statute came into force †¢ June 2014 – FinalRead MoreEquality Diversity and Inclusion in Work with Children and Young People956 Words   |  4 PagesEquality diversity and inclusion in work with children and young people: Alison Brooks Assessment of how own attitude values and behaviour could impact on work with young people and children. 2.3 All those working in the school have a legal duty to protect the rights of children and young people. It is important that you examine your own attitudes and values critically; to consider how these may impact on the way you work with children Rigid and divisive views from adults can be reflectedRead MoreEquality Diversity Inclusion1538 Words   |  7 Pages1.1 Explain what is meant by. Equality Equality is treating people fairly and making sure that everyone is given a fair chance and that their individual needs are met. It’s about giving all sections of the community equal access to employment, education and other services that are provided whilst valuing and respecting them. Recognising that different sections of the community require specific measures to make sure they receive equality. Recognising how and why some groups are underrepresentedRead MoreDiscrimination and Special Educational Needs Essay848 Words   |  4 PagesReform Act 1988 Introduced a national curriculum for all children, including those with special needs. Encouraged tendency towards in-class additional support rather than special classes for those with special educational needs. Sex Discrimination Act 1975 Outlaws discrimination on the grounds of gender or marital status in employment, education, transport and the provision of goods and services. Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001 Amended parts of the DDA (to include education Support Children and Young People with Disabilities and... NVQ Support Teaching and Learning In Schools Level 2 Trainee : Chris Gerry Trenance Learning Academy Newquay Unit TDA 2.15 – Support children and young people with disabilities and special educational needs. 1.1 – Outline the legal requirements of disabled children and young people and those with special educational needs. Most schools and academies now have written policies and parts of their mission statements specifically made for the inclusion and equality of SEN children. They must be in written form and should also be posted on the website for access to all who require it. There should also be policies which show the rights and responsibilities of those within the environment. The policies may be a number of†¦show more content†¦Knowledge and understanding of the way the world works: Using materials around us to make things from our environment. Using ICT tools to gain information about life. Learning about their role in the world and what they could achieve. Personal, social and emotional development: How they feel about themselves and helping them to develop a sense of self and how to respect others. Other social skills include getting dressed and undressed, washing themselves. Also wanting to learn and getting excited when learning. Physical Development: Helping with coordination of body parts and how you can use hands and feet to move things. How to control your movements in an effective manner. The importance of a good, healthy diet and how it can affect performance. Problem Solving, Numeracy and Reasoning: Helping to expand their knowledge of problem solving using stories, games, role play, singing and games. Making the child feel easy talking about and understanding the language of reasoning and problem solving. Communication, literacy and language: You need to assist the children in confidence building with positive praise. Also making sure they can communicate in a proper manner viaShow MoreRelatedSupport Children and Young People with Disabilities and Special Educational Needs2247 Words   |  9 PagesOutline the legal entitlements of disabled children and young people and those with special educational needs. Anyone providing services for children with special needs – health, education or social service departments, as well as voluntary organisations – must act within the legal framework. Legislation can change at any time and all health, education and social care practitioners, also Early Years workers, should be alert to new Acts and Regulations. There have been many changes to legislationRead MoreThe Mental Disabilities Include Autism, Down Syndrome And1348 Words   |  6 PagesThe mental disabilities include autism, Down syndrome and many more. They need support from their parents, guardians, teachers, the government, and anyone else is taking part in their day-to-day lives. Such children need attention so that they do not miss on the important parts of their lives. This study aims to look at the people involved in their lives and the roles and responsibilities they play. For those children and young people who researchers identify as having such needs, will be hard toRead MoreTda 2.4 Equality, Diversity and Inclusion in Work with Children and Young People1458 Words   |  6 Pagesin work with children and young people The current legislative framework protecting the equal rights of all children and young people are stated in the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989). These rights are extensive, including the right to education and the right for children and young people to have their views respected. The Children Act 1989 sets out the duty of local authorities to provide services according to the needs of all children and young people. Every ChildRead MoreLife Long Learning for Students with Disabilities Essay example639 Words   |  3 PagesProviding services for young students with disabilities is not negotiable. This is because, these young learners requires special care and services in their day to day activities. Developmental disability has become a common diagnosis in children these days. This disability starts during a child’s development period and may last for a life time. Special educational programs are available for children with development disabilities. The diagnosis of developmental disabilities can be done at an earlyRead MoreIdentify the Current Legislation and Codes of Practice to the Promotion of Equality and Valuing of Diversity.1402 Words   |  6 Pagesguidelines and procedures for ensuring equality. These policies must take account the rights of all children and young people. The policies in place work to ensure equality and inclusion; this can be conducted through the teaching and learning that occurs in the setting. However, the policies must also pay regard to the values and practice which are part of all aspects of school life. All work with children should be underpinned by the principles and values as stated in the National Occupational StandardsRead MoreSpecial Educational Needs And Disability887 Words   |  4 Pages(SEND) stands for Special Educational Needs and Disability. QUOTE A learner’s needs may be too complex for a class teacher to fully cater provide for. It is possible that more support and even specialist help maybe needed for example speech and language therapy. â€Å"This is usually when a child is described as having ‘special needs†. (Somerville Primary School, 2016). It is true that having SEND can affect a learner’s capacity to learn. A Send learner may show inappropriate behaviour, find it hardRead MoreNew Send Code Of Practice And How It Affects Schools And Teaching Practices1295 Words   |  6 Pagesthe new legislation that the government had put into place last year. The key piece of legislation is The Children and Families Act 2014. †¢ The SEND Code of Practice is part of the wider plan to improve outcomes for disadvantaged children. †¢ Feb 2011 – the DfE published its Green Paper titled ‘Support and Aspiration’ a new approach to special needs and disability. †¢ March 2014 – Children and Families Bill received Royal Assent. †¢ 22nd April 2014 – The statute came into force †¢ June 2014 – FinalRead MoreEquality Diversity and Inclusion in Work with Children and Young People956 Words   |  4 PagesEquality diversity and inclusion in work with children and young people: Alison Brooks Assessment of how own attitude values and behaviour could impact on work with young people and children. 2.3 All those working in the school have a legal duty to protect the rights of children and young people. It is important that you examine your own attitudes and values critically; to consider how these may impact on the way you work with children Rigid and divisive views from adults can be reflectedRead MoreEquality Diversity Inclusion1538 Words   |  7 Pages1.1 Explain what is meant by. Equality Equality is treating people fairly and making sure that everyone is given a fair chance and that their individual needs are met. It’s about giving all sections of the community equal access to employment, education and other services that are provided whilst valuing and respecting them. Recognising that different sections of the community require specific measures to make sure they receive equality. Recognising how and why some groups are underrepresentedRead MoreDiscrimination and Special Educational Needs Essay848 Words   |  4 PagesReform Act 1988 Introduced a national curriculum for all children, including those with special needs. Encouraged tendency towards in-class additional support rather than special classes for those with special educational needs. Sex Discrimination Act 1975 Outlaws discrimination on the grounds of gender or marital status in employment, education, transport and the provision of goods and services. Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001 Amended parts of the DDA (to include education

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Utilitarianism The And Influential Moral Theories

Utilitarianism is one of the most renowned and influential moral theories. The basis of act utilitarianism is maximizing utility, that is, doing the things that maximize happiness over suffering. Utilitarians reject moral codes that are based on customs or traditions given by leaders or supernatural deities because they judge the truth or justifiability of morality as its positive contribution to all beings. Both act utilitarians and rule utilitarians concur that the overall aim in determining the morality of our actions should be to create the best possible results, but they differ in their methods. However, do the methods of act utilitarianism stand up to the traditional rule utilitarian style? Per say that a person maximizes the utility of each specific action that they do, then they have maximized the overall utility that is within their power. If a person occasionally choses options that produce less positive results than other solutions, the total positivity of their actions wo uld be less than the amount of positive than could have been created. This reason is what allows act utilitarians to argue that humans should apply the utilitarian principle to specific acts, not to classes of similar actions. Act utilitarianism is the most natural interpretation of utilitarian ideals, and elaborates further into what is morally correct, as opposed to the traditional rule utilitarian style. For instance, the Ten Commandments are a set of traditional rules that focus on generalShow MoreRelatedThe Most Influential Moral Theories : Virtue Ethics, Deontology, And Utilitarianism2412 Words   |  10 Pagesthe moral criteria that we as human beings have. They are the rules of the game that are supposed to guide us through our decision making in life and how to behave to one another as part of a society. However, there are different perspectives on how this criteria should be used, and when and whom they apply to. I will focus on the three most influential moral theories: virtue ethics, deontology, and utilitarianism. Although there are many great names of philosophers that fall in those theories, IRead MoreUtilitarianism Vs. Kantian Theory1100 Words   |  5 PagesMelanie Dolechek 3/30/17 PHI Essay #2 Utilitarianism vs Kantian Theory Morality is a complex subject and ethical dilemmas yield differing opinions and theories that have manifested through time by intelligent philosophers. There were two influential philosophers’ names Jeremy Bentham and Immanuel Kant, who formed differing theories, in an attempt to set a uniform approach to ethical dilemmas and morality. Bentham was a firm supporter of Utilitarian theory; which focuses on overall happiness andRead MoreUtilitarianism : Utilitarianism And Rule Utilitarianism871 Words   |  4 PagesUtilitarianism, which is also called consequentialism, is a theory in normative ethics. It is one of the best known and most influential moral theories. The main idea of utilitarianism is to determine whether actions are morally good or bad, right or wrong depends on their consequences rather than intentions. (Moreland 1) In order to understand utilitarianism, it is important to learn about Jeremy Bentham, who is the influential philosopher represented utilitarianism t he best. The utilitarianismRead MoreUtilitarianism Vs. Utilitarianism Theory909 Words   |  4 Pages In the history of philosophy Utilitarianism has been viewed as one of the best of the moral theories. It has become one the most powerful, influential, and most persuasive approach to normative ethics. The utilitarianism theory also has had a major impacts on approaches to economic, political, and social policy. The utilitarianism theory had originally had been created by Jeremy Bentham. His version of was that aggregate pleasure after deducting suffering of all involved in any action. HoweverRead MoreEthical Theories Supporting Different Moral Perspectives Of Human Actions871 Words   |  4 PagesThere are numerous ethical theories supporting different moral perspectives of human actions. The various theories differ according to the way in which they require people to act, and in their fundamental arguments. Because of different perspectives and philosophical views, no ethical t heory can be said to be superior to the other. The paper that follows describes and defends the ethical theory of utilitarianism. Reasons why Utilitarianism is the Correct Ethical Theory i. It reinforces rationalityRead MoreUtilitarianism, By John Stuart Mill And Utilitarianism880 Words   |  4 PagesMoral theories are sometimes hard to define, but with John Stuart Mill and Utilitarianism it is a little bit easier. Utilitarianism is an easy one, for the reason that it is defined by the greatest happiness for everyone involved. Sometimes it does not always make everyone content, but if you look at it as a whole it makes sense. Mill says that we have to look at the bigger picture. One person’s happiness affects another’s and so on. Utilitarianism is a moral theory that John Stuart Mill, the philosopherRead MoreThe Moral Theory Of Utilitarianism1725 Words   |  7 PagesNumerous moral theories have surfaced in the past years. They have been widely debated by philosophers and social reformers. It is important to understand what these theories are because of their influential tendencies in the way people act, especially in making morally right or wrong d ecisions. Utilitarianism is one of these many moral theories. Upon further analysis, problems with utilitarian thoughts are revealed. It has been widely debated by many philosophers, including G.E. Moore and ImmanuelRead MoreBroad-Based Blac Economic Empowerment996 Words   |  4 Pagesarticle is to discuss the ethical consequences of BBBEE and other affirmative action tools implemented by the South African Government, and the role of these measures in the present and future workplace. Stakeholder Theory Stakeholder theory states that managers within a company have a moral duty beyond merely maximizing profits and not involving potential role players (Beauchamp 2009). It says that a manager has ethical obligations to help all stakeholders within a company as well as external stakeholdersRead MoreThe Moral Problem Of A Moral Theory1450 Words   |  6 PagesSome people think that one aim of a moral theory is to give one a â€Å"decision procedure† to use when faced with moral problems. Decision procedures are defined as procedures that are similar to an algorithm for determining a finite number of specific steps that validate a particular proposition or argument. Well known examples of a decision procedure is the popular Venn-diagrams for aid in determining an interpretation of categorical knowledge and truth tables which are used in calculus problems. ButRead MoreThe Ethical Responsibilities Of Business Ethics Essay1737 Words   |  7 Pagesdilemma perspective with three different ethical theories, Kantian, utilitarianism and egoism. Based on the information from Jean’s case, the existence of an ethical dilemma is implied. Generally, ethical dilemma is defined as† a complex situation that often involves an apparent mental conflict between moral imperatives, in which to obey one would result in transgressing another.†(Allen, n.d., para. 1). Ethical dilemma refers to a complex situation of moral conflicts without clear guidance about how to

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Capital Punishment deters murder, and is just Retr Essay Example For Students

Capital Punishment deters murder, and is just Retr Essay ibution. Capital punishment, is the execution of criminals by the state, forcommitting crimes, regarded so heinous, that this is the onlyacceptable punishment. Capital punishment does not only lower themurder rate, but its value as retribution alone is a good reason forhanding out death sentences. Support for the death penalty in theU.S. has risen to an average of 80% according to an article written byRichard Worsnop, entitled Death penalty debate centres onRetribution, this figure is slightly lower in Canada where supportfor the death penalty is at 72% of the population over 18 years ofage, as stated in article by Kirk Makir, in the March 26, 1987 editionof the Globe and Mail, titled B.C. MPs split on Death Penalty. The death penalty deters murder by putting the fear of deathinto would be killers. A person is less likely to do something, if heor she thinks that harm will come to him. Another way the deathpenalty deters murder, is the fact that if the killer is dead, he willnot be able to kill again. Most supporters of the death penalty feel that offenders shouldbe punished for their crimes, and that it does not matter whether itwill deter the crime rate. Supporters of the death penalty are infavour of making examples out of offenders, and that the threat ofdeath will be enough to deter the crime rate, but the crime rate isirrelevant. According to Isaac Ehrlichs study, published on April 16,1976, eight murders are deterred for each execution that is carriedout in the U.S.A. He goes on to say, If one execution of a guiltycapital murderer deters the murder of one innocent life, the executionis justified. To most supporters of the death penalty, like Ehrlich,if even 1 life is saved, for countless executions of the guilty, it isa good reason for the death penalty. The theory that society engagesin murder when executing the guilty, is considered invalid by mostsupporters, including Ehrlich. He feels that execution of convictedoffenders expresses the great value society places on innocent life. Isaac Ehrlich goes on to state that racism is also a point usedby death penalty advocates. We will use the U.S. as examples, sincewe can not look at the inmates on death row in Canada, because theirare laws in Canada that state that crime statistics can not be basedon race, also the fact that there are no inmates on death row inCanada. In the U.S. 16 out of 1000 whites arrested for murder aresentenced to death, while 12 of 1000 blacks arrested for murder weresentenced to death. 1.1% of black inmates on death row were executed,while 1.7% of white inmates will die. Another cry for racism, as according to Ehrlich, that is raisedby advocates of the death penalty is based on the colour of thevictim, for example if the victim is white, it is more likely thatthe offender will get the death penalty than if the victim had beenblack. This is true, if you look at the actual number of people whoare murder. More people kill whites and get the death penalty, thenpeople who kill blacks and get the death penalty. The reason for thisis that more whites are killed, and the murders captured. Now if welook at the number of blacks killed it is a lot less, but you haveto look at these numbers proportionately. Percent wise it is almostthe same number for any race, so this is not the issue. .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5 , .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5 .postImageUrl , .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5 , .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5:hover , .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5:visited , .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5:active { border:0!important; } .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5:active , .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5 .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u50ef99cdb42e45b284b5135c8758b4e5:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Tess Of The DUbervilles EssayIn a 1986 study done by Professor Stephen K. Layson of theUniversity of North Carolina, the conclusions made by Ehrilich wereupdated, and showed to be a little on the low side as far as thedeterrence factor of capital punishment. Professor Layson found that18 murders were deterred by each execution is the U.S. He also foundthat executions increases in probability of arrest, conviction, andother executions of heinous offenders. According to a statement issued by George C. Smith, Director ofLitigation, Washington Legal Foundation, titled In Support of theDeath Penalty, support for the death penalty has grown in the U.S.,as the crime rate increased. In 1966, 42% of Americans were in favourof capital punishment while 47% were opposed to it. Since the crimerate United states has increased, support for the capital punishmenthas followed suit. In 1986, support for capital punishment was 80%for and only 17% against with 3% undecided, but most of the undecidedvotes said they were leaning toward a pro capital punishment stance,if they had to vote on it immediately. Let us now focus on Canada. The last two people to beexecuted, in Canada were Arthur Lucas and Ron Turpin. They wereexecuted on December 11, 1962. The executions in Canada were carriedout by hanging. The death penalty was abolished in Canada in thelatter part of 1976, after a debate that lasted 98 hours. The deathpenalty was only beaten by 6 votes. If we look back to 1976, the yearthe death penalty was abolished in Canada, threats of death, werebeing made to Members of Parliament and their immediate families frompro death penalty advocates. Most members of parliament, voted ontheir own personal feelings, as opposed to the views of their voters.2The same was the case in British Colombia, where accepting ofthe death penalty, if it was reinstated 1987 , by the federalgovernment was discussed. The M.P.s were split, 17 out of 29 were forthe death penalty. This showed, that even the majority of the M.P.swere in favour of the death penalty in B.C. Support for the deathpenalty in British Col umbia at the time was almost 70%, but the M.P.sfelt that it was up to them to vote how they felt was right, and notto vote on which vote would give them the best chance for a secondterm.3In 1987, the Progressive Conservative government wanted to holda free vote on the reinstatement of Capital punishment, but Justiceminister Ray Hnatyshyn, who was opposed to it, pressured the M.P.s,into voted against the bill. Ray Hnatyshyn, was the deciding factor,if not for him, it was widely believed that the reinstatement ofcapital punishment would have gone through, and the death penaltywould be a reality today.4Capital punishment is such a volatile issue, and both sides areso deeply rooted in their views that they are willing to do almostanything to sway all of the people they can to their side. We personally feel, and our views are backed up by proof, inthe form of studies by the likes of Isaac Ehrlichs 1975 and Prof. Stephen K. Laysons, that was published in 1986, and polls that havebeen taken both in Canada and the United States over the past fewyears. All of these studies and surveys show that capital punishmentis a valid deterrent to crime, and obviously the public, and societyas a whole are in favour of it. The death penalty makes would becapital offenders think about weather committing a crime is reallyworth their lives. Even if capital punishment did not deter crime,the simple fact that it will allow society to get even with murders. .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485 , .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485 .postImageUrl , .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485 , .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485:hover , .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485:visited , .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485:active { border:0!important; } .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485:active , .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485 .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u639213b5a87e854d4af6ecaefd53e485:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Methanol As Fuel EssayCapital punishment also insures peace of mind because it insures thatmurders will never kill again. Works Cited1 From: Take Notice, (Copp Clarke Pitman Ltd., 1979) page 1632 From: Article written by David Vienneau published in the March 24,1987 edition of the Toronto Star, titled, Debate Agonizing for MPs. 3 From: Article written by Kirk Makir, published in March 26, 1987edition of the Globe and Mail, titled, BC MPs Split on Death PenaltyDebate. 4 From: Article written by Hugh Winsor, published in April 29, 1987edition of the Globe and Mail, titled, Debate on Death Penaltyplaced on hold.

Thursday, April 9, 2020

Automotive Industry in the United States

Abstract The main purpose of operating any business entity is to generate profit. As a matter of fact, expanding the revenue base and maximizing profits are key concerns of any business enterprise located in a competitive business environment.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on Automotive Industry in the United States specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More This implies that business organizations should create competitive advantages by developing viable marketplace strategies. The latter is necessary in order to outwit the stiff market competition. Hence, there is need to formulate a management process which is well structured in tandem with the market demands of an organization’s products. An attractive framework has been offered by Michael Porter in this analysis. From the Porter’s Five Forces framework, it is possible for business enterprises to survive and remain profitable even in highly competitive mar kets. For example, management teams in business organizations should not ignore to identify and manage the impacts of substitute products in the market. Any form of a substitute good or service is a real threat to the operations and sustained profitability of a firm. This analysis relates the Porter’s Five Forces framework with the growth prospects of the automotive industry in the United States. Introduction to the Auto Industry A number of factors have generally influenced the transformation of the automotive industry. For instance, manufacturing and assembling vehicle components, changes in the marketing of automotive products, development of supply chain, assembling practices, market fluctuation of fuel prices, development of infrastructures and the overall business structure of the industry have immensely evolved operations in the sector (Samuelson Marks, 2012).Advertising Looking for essay on business economics? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Historical records attest to the fact that the invention and innovation of engines marked the humble beginning of the development of automotive industry. This early development was particularly agitated by the emergence of new forms of transporting energy. For instance, gasoline was used during the 19th century as an important source of energy. Hence, it experienced high demand in different locations. Therefore, new methods of transporting the product were necessary. Steam was also a crucial medium for fueling engines during the century. After the full development phase of various sources of energy, initial automobile firms began to take shape. It can be recalled that the earliest motor vehicle companies were established after full discovery of oil and gas resources. The development of other vital motor vehicle components such as the steering wheel and floor-mounted accelerators followed later towards the late 19th century and early 20th century (Sie miatycki, 2012). As a result, the automotive industry experienced rapid development in terms of both manufacturing technology and the speed of assembling parts. Contemporary vehicles have been made lighter, more fuel efficient, and simpler to use. Nonetheless, it is crucial to mention that the automotive industry is an equal opportunity employer in the United States and other manufacturing countries. In spite of the recent 2007/2008 global economic recession, the future outlook of the industry is still impressive.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on Automotive Industry in the United States specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More A considerable share of the market may not be guaranteed when substitute products enter the market. On the same note, it is inevitable for other competing firms to enter the same market. Managements in organizations should factor such risks when running their firms. Rivalry experienced from other c ompetitors can only be curtailed if thorough strategic planning is put in place. In regards to the buyers’ bargaining power, it is crucial to provide customers with a competitive pricing model that is more favorable than that of the immediate market rivals. Besides, the bargaining power of suppliers is fundamental because they are part and parcel of the profit optimization plan of a business enterprise. Industry Definition The automotive industry in America is specifically concerned with both manufacturing and marketing of various types of vehicles. In the course of this core function, the industry also designs the automobile products according to the tastes and preferences of the targeted market. Hence, this calls for continuous Research and Development (RD) in the sector (Siemiatycki, 2012). Both the local and overseas markets are supplied with motor vehicles manufactured from the US automotive industry. Statistical financial records indicate that over 70 million pieces of motor vehicles were manufactured during the 2008 fiscal year. These entailed both light and heavy commercial vehicles. Over the same period, the sales volume for brand new motor vehicles was about 80 million. However, the onset of the global credit crunch in 2007/2008 affected the buying power of customers and equally led to high cost of raw materials. Consequently, the industry was compelled to undergo pricing pressure for its products. As it stands now, intense external competition is a major threat to the industry.Advertising Looking for essay on business economics? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More In other words, private vehicle usage has declined considerably as part of cost cutting measures by consumers. Industry Profile Consolidations of the American automotive industry as well as the size and growth rate define the industry profile of the automotive sector in the United States. In addition, three leading manufacturers of light commercial vehicles (trucks) have punctuated the international investment portfolio of the automotive industry in the United States (Uzwyshyn, 2012). Individual companies within the industry are also experiencing significant employment shifts especially when some workers are compelled by situations to change their states of residence. The industry is also a key contributor to labor relations organizations and health insurance schemes (Siemiatycki, 2012). Industry Structure The equipment, parts and motor vehicle departments employ more than one million American citizens besides expatriates. Ever since Chrysler, Ford and General Motors diversified the ir production segments in the market, significant shifts in the industry structure have been recorded. For example, importation and local production of cars by other overseas firms were a common experience since the early beginning of the New Millennium. It is evident that the three main manufacturers diverted their attention in manufacturing light trucks instead of saloon cars (Uzwyshyn, 2012). The foreign manufacturers are a real sourceof competition for Ford, GM and Chrysler motor companies. Due to the desire to restructure the local automotive industry in the US, these firms have already shed off 700, 000 employees. On the other hand, foreign firms have hired close to 400,000 workers in order to meet their production demand. Future Outlook Data obtained from the CAR group indicate that the growth in the sale of motor vehicles will still stagnate in the near future until negative economic effects are phased out completely (McAlinden Chen, 2012). Hence, the future depicts a slow recovery rate of the automotive industry in the US. Even if the US economy begins to perform strongly, the record pent-up demand will be the main driving force in the growth of sales. However, this scenario will only be possible with new vehicles and not used machines. The industry is also expected to recover to the level it was immediately before credit crunch began in 2007. Nonetheless, the same level of recovery might not be attained in automotive employment (Gao, Hensley Zielke, 2014). After scrutinizing the US automotive industry, economic experts argue that this sector of the economy might not experience robust growth in the next few years. Nonetheless, the growth initiatives that have been put in place by the federal government are highly likely to accelerate growth in this industry. If the current innovations are effective enough, then the industry may begin to recover gradually from the year 2016. The double-digit growth in terms of sales may take quite a long time before it is realized. However, there is some hope that the industry will begin to gain momentum by increasing revenue base from 2016 onwards as shown in the graph below. Source: CAR Porter’s Five Forces Strategy Analysis as it applies to the Auto Industry Bargaining Power of Buyers It is critical for the automotive industry to establish a cordial relationship with consumers of its products. The decline of the buying power of consumers may spell doom to the industry (Mucheru, Mwangi, Mandere, Bichanga Gongera, 2014). In other words, the sector players should make sure that buyers receive the best bargain in the market. The latter should have a sensible and favorable power to bargain products manufactured by the industry. Since the automotive products are relatively standardized, consumers tend to control more power when it comes to making buying decisions. In addition, the competing brands within the same industry creates an impressive playground for consumers to bargain which pro ducts to buy and at what price. Nevertheless, the low production ratio compared to the high number of buyers will obviously make the industry relatively powerful (Porter, 2008). Bargaining Power of Suppliers The industry wields more power than suppliers in this case study. There are strong-willed buyers in the industry who are in a position to champion for their tastes and preferences when dealing with suppliers. This favors the industry players (Porter, 2008). Since major proliferation of automobile firms is absent, buyers will remain powerful at the detriment of suppliers. About 90 percent of value shipment in the US is held by the main automotive firms. Besides, backward integration occurrence will be the main source of power for the industry. Eventually, suppliers will experience a weak bargaining power (Uzwyshyn, 2012). Competitive Rivalry in the Industry Both the US and global automotive markets experience stiff rivalry. Chrysler, Ford and General Motors have apparently sought other external opportunities to sell their products instead of relying on local consumers. These firms have opted to globalize their competition arena as other foreign players take charge of the US market. Poor engagement of these firms in the US markets has led into slow growth of the automotive industry in the wider North American region (Uzwyshyn, 2012). It is apparent that the three rivals have decided to adopt a non-aggressive method of competing at the local market. Threat of New Entrants There are significant entry barriers into this manufacturing sector. The minimum amount of capital required to initiate an automotive firm is quite large. Hence, the latter is a major prohibitive factor. As a new entrant into the industry, specialized automotive manufacturing facilities are required. Nevertheless, old players in the industry are keenly expanding their operations through strategic partnerships (Uzwyshyn, 2012). The significant setbacks to venture into this sector have enhance d the profitability of existing firms in the industry owing to lack of perfect competition. The global markets have provided a lot of success to most automotive firms. Threat of Substitutes Although there are substitutes to automobiles in the United States, the impacts have not been felt. As much as the American population may opt to travel using airplanes, trains or ships, none of these modes of transport is universally convenient like motor vehicles. The latter offers the best independence and utility for most travelers within the US borders (Uzwyshyn, 2012). Additional time may be required when travelling using trains and ships. Nonetheless, trains and ships are relatively cost effective and may provide a better substitute for travelers who are not in a hurry. A high elasticity of demand is common with substitute automobiles such as airplanes and trains especially in regards to price factor. Conclusion In spite of profitability, the automotive industry in the United States still faces numerous operational challenges. The aforementioned challenges in this industry can be effectively addressed using the Porter’s Five Forces framework. As already discussed in the paper, the threat of new entrants is apparently the main advantage of the existing automotive firms in the US. Several barriers hinder new entrants into this industry and continue to guarantee high profitability for old firms. In addition, substitutes in this industry do not pose any substantial effects as discussed in the paper. However, the bargaining power of customers and competitive rivalry are major issues that still impede the operations of firms in this industry. References Gao, P., Hensley, R., Zielke, A. (2014). A road map to the future for the auto industry. Mckinsey Quarterly, 1 (4), 42-53. McAlinden, S.P. Chen, Y. (2012). After the Bailout: Future Prospects for the U.S. Auto Industry. Retrieved from https://www.cargroup.org/ Mucheru, C.M., Mwangi, S., Mandere, E.N., Bichanga, J.M . Gongera, E. G. (2014). The Application of Porter’s Five Forces Model on Organization Performance. European Journal of Business and Management, 6(16), 75-86. Porter, M. E. (2008). The Five Competitive Forces that Shape Strategy. Harvard Business Review, 86(1), 78-93. Samuelson, W. Marks, S. (2012). Managerial economics. New Jersey, US: John Wiley Sons, Inc. Siemiatycki, E. (2012). Forced to Concede: Permanent Restructuring and Labour’s Place in the North American Auto Industry. Antipode, 44(2), 453-473. Uzwyshyn, R. (2012). The US Auto Industry in 2013: Five Forces to Consider. Automotive Industries, 192(11), 221-223. This essay on Automotive Industry in the United States was written and submitted by user Mekh1 to help you with your own studies. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly. You can donate your paper here.

Monday, March 9, 2020

Free Essays on The Highest Divorce Rate Is In Teen Marriages

In today’s society more and more teenagers are getting married every day. Marriages involving teenagers are more likely to end in divorce than those in any other age group. According with the U.S. Census Bureau, 59 percent of people that married under the age of 20, eventually get divorced within 10 years period; and almost 15 percent of teen-age couple divorce before the husband and wife turn 20 year old. This statistics will increase by every generation, due to the teenagers getting married at an early ages, and the number of children living in single-parent homes. One of the reasons that many teen marriages often fail is because they’re in disadvantage with today’s society. When people with 21 years old and below get married, they have to deal with different challenges in their lives. This is a new life style away from parents, families, and many times without friends. The aspect to get a job is one of the most important things to be successful, as a married person. Every one know that to get a job with just high school ( if really have high school diploma ) is though enough to get stress-out, depress, and frustrated; in addition most of the time we carry those problems at home. Depression will affect the couple, feeling their self unarmed to find the best way, to solve their problems, with the proper resources. Most teen marriages has problems in establish priorities and responsibilities like: pay rent, utilities, car, and attend their own spouses. The part that really is per judicial is pregnancy and childhood at this level. Some times, I ask to myself: â€Å" who kids can raise kids?†. Definitely, be a responsible parent involve certain grade of economic status, mature, knowledge ( about children and live ), patience, love, and sense of responsibility. Certainly, there is when most of teen marriages often fail. Is too â€Å"stressful† for a young person taking care of a spouse, all the responsibilities, ... Free Essays on The Highest Divorce Rate Is In Teen Marriages Free Essays on The Highest Divorce Rate Is In Teen Marriages In today’s society more and more teenagers are getting married every day. Marriages involving teenagers are more likely to end in divorce than those in any other age group. According with the U.S. Census Bureau, 59 percent of people that married under the age of 20, eventually get divorced within 10 years period; and almost 15 percent of teen-age couple divorce before the husband and wife turn 20 year old. This statistics will increase by every generation, due to the teenagers getting married at an early ages, and the number of children living in single-parent homes. One of the reasons that many teen marriages often fail is because they’re in disadvantage with today’s society. When people with 21 years old and below get married, they have to deal with different challenges in their lives. This is a new life style away from parents, families, and many times without friends. The aspect to get a job is one of the most important things to be successful, as a married person. Every one know that to get a job with just high school ( if really have high school diploma ) is though enough to get stress-out, depress, and frustrated; in addition most of the time we carry those problems at home. Depression will affect the couple, feeling their self unarmed to find the best way, to solve their problems, with the proper resources. Most teen marriages has problems in establish priorities and responsibilities like: pay rent, utilities, car, and attend their own spouses. The part that really is per judicial is pregnancy and childhood at this level. Some times, I ask to myself: â€Å" who kids can raise kids?†. Definitely, be a responsible parent involve certain grade of economic status, mature, knowledge ( about children and live ), patience, love, and sense of responsibility. Certainly, there is when most of teen marriages often fail. Is too â€Å"stressful† for a young person taking care of a spouse, all the responsibilities, ...

Saturday, February 22, 2020

The Process of Industrialization Research Paper

The Process of Industrialization - Research Paper Example Some feel that the amount of income increased, but this was easily offset by the repercussions of those earnings. It is critical to weigh the merits of each proposition in order to effectively assess the effects of industrialization on worker’s conditions of living. Marxists and their attack on industrialization Marxists were the most predominant opponents of the industrial revolution. They believed that capitalism was an unjust system in which controllers of capital took advantage of the masses for economic gain. Therefore, to adherents of this school of thought, industrialization spelt nothing but gloom and doom for the group. Marxists could not fathom a situation where workers were better off in the industrial era than they were in previous economic periods. The very fact that factory owners were trying to squeeze out as much surplus value as possible from their employee was reason enough to oppose it. Members of this school did not really care whether workers could purchas e more goods or access more products than they had initially accessed in previous regimes. Their concern was the injustice that was meted against these persons. To the Marxist, controllers of capital simply paid workers seemingly higher wages in order to compensate for the exploitative work conditions in their factories. Industrialization took away workers’ control over resources and put it in the hands of a few people. Wages may have been lower in the pre-industrial era but at least resource ownership was less concentrated than during the industrial revolution. However, these arguments may not hold water when one examines the rate at which incomes rose between 1820 and 1860. Even though Marxists make a strong point when highlighting the ills of industrialization, their assertions must be compared to the conditions of living before the industrial era. These theorists still have a problem with the system of land ownership and mercantilism in pre-industrial Britain. Therefore, they seem to object to almost every method of economic control. In fact, their ideal society was one in which equal distribution of wealth existed; that is the communist society (Jessop and Wheatley 55). The point of this paper is not to determine whether industrialization was exploitative; it is to decipher whether it had a positive or negative effect on the population. Positive outcomes can arise even in exploitative conditions. Some gains occurred in workers’ lives but one must asses whether those gains were sufficient enough to warrant a change in their standards of living. It is for this reason that other elements of history must be examined. Liberalists and the consumer revolution Another school of thought emerged concerning the living conditions of persons in the industrial revolution, and this was the liberalist school. Followers of this theory asserted that industrialization was a beneficial occurrence in the lives of these workers because it ushered in the consumer revolution. These rapid changes in production processes enabled the creation of mass consumer goods at affordable prices. Therefore, for the first time, the average laborer could afford such things. At the theoretical level, it can be deduced that industrialization led to an expansion of markets, which sold manufactured goods. Additionally, the industrial re